Developing Cultural Competence

Training

 

INTERACTIVE

Involving participants in the learning process by using strategies like built-in quizzes, interspersed tasks, teamwork interludes etc.

EXPERIENTIAL

Participants themselves create and share experiences that illustrate key concepts, principles, or core messages.

MULTIDIMENSIONAL

The content and design of the training includes a combination of awareness, knowledge, skills, attitudes.

Consultancy

 

“EXPERT ROLE”

Our consultants provides expert knowledge or skills that the organization does not have in-house

“COLLABORATIVE ROLE”

We work in partnership with organization, contributing process knowledge but leaving the decision to the client.

“A PAIR OF HANDS”

We can do tasks that a client organization knows how to do itself, but doesn’t have the staff to accomplish.

Speakers for Events

 

EDUCATIONAL

The presentations include new information and knowledge elements relevant to the topic.

ENLIGHTENING

The insights and explanations very often change the perception and shift the focus towards a deeper understanding.

ENTERTAINING

The humour helps to soften challenging issues, clarify confusions end makes the learning more enjoyable.

Dr. Grosu brings a level of professional skill and personal approachability to her work which is of a high professional standard. The testimonial I have heard Dr. Grosu and I am pleased to say that she engaged the audience in her presentation of the cultural aspects of medical illness. She used humour and audience participation both to reflect on the issues. Dr. Grosu approach was entirely suited to the audience of medical students drawn from a wide variety of cultures.

Simon Smith
Director of Communications
School of Medicine
University College Cork

CultureWise Blog

Onion & Iceberg models of the Culture

The Onion Model
The image of an onion is often used to describe the different layers of culture. Culture can be broken down into layers: The outer layers are composed of the artefacts and products as well as patterns of behaviour. The next layer encompasses the beliefs, norms and attitudes of that culture. The middle of the onion represents the underlying cultural assumptions and values. As the most hidden layer, these aspects of culture are much harder to recognise and understand, but all of the other layers are built upon the centre of the culture onion. Therefore, careful analysis and a better understanding of the different layers as well as how they interact and influence each other is necessary. Intercultural training can help to understand the different layers of culture and their significance.